Many anti-cancer drugs are highly toxic to patients. About 70% of childhood cancer survivors experience some side-effects from their treatment.

There is a great need to reduce the toxicity and improve the specificity of anticancer drugs. Nanotechnology allows us to design polymers that can package-up and deliver therapeutic drugs or genetic material specifically to tumour cells.

To explore the possibilities, we are research partners with UNSW in the Australian Centre for Nanomedicine.

We’re thrilled that our research with UNSW made recent news about delivering pancreatic cancer drugs directly where they’re needed.

The research team developed a highly promising technology to deliver gene-silencing drugs to treat pancreatic cancer – the most chemotherapy-resistant and deadly cancer in Australia.  When tested in mice, the new nanomedicine resulted in a 50 per cent reduction in the growth of tumours and reduced the spread of pancreatic cancer. The results were published in the journal Biomacromolecules.

Congratulations to researchers Phoebe Phillips, Maria Kavallaris, Josh McCarroll and team!

Read more about our research into Tumour Biology and Targeting and the UNSW announcement.



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